Friday, 22 September 2017

Findmypast adds Dublin Electoral Rolls

Findmypast just made available electoral rolls, over 427,000 records, with the names of those eligible to vote between 1908 and 1915 in Dublin.

Voting eligibility for local elections was restricted to men over the age of 21 and women over the age of 30 who either resided in the city or owned property there.

The original electoral registers are held by the Dublin City Library & Archives.

Act today:Sign the Petition to Update Crown Copyright

Canadians paid for it. We should have access.

Royal Commissions, Parliamentary reports, statistical publications…are the raw materials of good journalism and history in a democratic country. As it is these publications can be changed or removed without warning, especially if the content is not supportive of government policy or otherwise embarrassing.

If they’re deleted, you might still be able to find them via web harvesters like the Wayback Machine. Or they might be gone forever. It’s hit and miss.

The solution is to address Section 12 of the Copyright Act legal scholars have labelled a “legislative monstrosity” and called for its abolishment. It dates from 1911 and British legislation which has long since been superceded -- but not in Canada.

Open up the material we paid for.

Act now. Sign the petition to bring Canadian legislation in line with other democracies .

The online petition closes on September 23 so act now. Sign it at www.FixCrownCopyright.ca

WDYTYA UK on YouTube

Several episodes from the most recent British TV series of Who Do You Think You Are? are new on YouTube.

They are supported by advertizing.

Noel Clarke
Fearne Cotton
Charles Dance
Lisa Hammond
Ian McKellen

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Ancestry adds England, Extracted Parish and Court Records, 1399-1795

New to Ancestry is this collection of 93,495 early parish records. All entries I could find were sourced from a publication Musgrave's Obituaries Prior to 1800. They are index entries with name and death date (sometimes just year), and relate to the more well to do in society. There is no link to further information in the original publication.

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

O ...Tops Baby Names in England and Wales 2016

Olivia was the most popular for girls replacing Amelia, which has been the most popular since 2011.

Oliver remains as the most popular first name for boys as it has since 2013.

The top ten names for boys were:
Oliver (6,623), Harry (5,284), George (5,263), Jack, Jacob,  Noah, Charlie, Muhammad, Thomas, Oscar. 

For girls:
Olivia (5,017), Alemia (4,777), Emily (3,551), Isla, Ava, Isabella, Lilly, Jessica, Ella, Mia.

The number of different baby names registered in England and Wales in 2016 was 28,274 for boys and 35,645 for girls.

Find the top 100 names and details of the names through history from the Office of National Statistics release at https://www.ons.gov.uk/releases/babynamesinenglandandwales2016


Heritage Ignite! at OPL

In the Auditorium at OPL Main (120 Metcalfe) on Wednesday 27 September, 2017 at 6:30pm Ottawa’s local history enthusiasts will share their passion for our past!  Speakers are local history experts from: Lost Ottawa, Today in Ottawa's History, Workers' History Museum, Ottawa Free Tour, Black History Ottawa, City of Ottawa Archives and Museums, and Heritage Ottawa who will have 5 minutes each to tell you why they’re passionate about Ottawa’s history.

Register here.

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Signatures: Paul Martin

A reminder of the forthcoming interview of former Prime Minister Paul Martin by Dr. Guy Berthiaume, Librarian and Archivist of Canada, before a live audience. It's the next event in the Signatures Series which features prominent Canadians who have fonds in the LAC collection. The event starts at 12:15 p.m. at Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington St., 2nd floor, Ottawa. 

More at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/about-us/events/Pages/2017/signatures-series-Paul-Martin.aspx

Monday, 18 September 2017

Discovering Print Resources for Genealogy

The Ottawa Public Library offers a 90 minute session on the types of print resources you can use to do basic genealogy research or add depth to your family history, and introduce the resources available in OPL’s collections.

Monday 25 September, 2017 at 2:00pm at Nepean Centrepointe.

Registration Required.

Advance Notice: Arnprior & McNab/Braeside Archives Genealogy Day

The program is now available for this 14 October 2017 event at the Nick Smith Centre

8:30 – 9:00 Registration and Explore Marketplace 
9:00 – 9:10 Introduction and Welcome
 9:15 – 10:00 1st Speaker 
MARY CAMPBELL: NEW WORLD, NEW OPPORTUNITIES, 
FAMILY SETTLEMENT (SCOTTISH THEME)
10:00 – 10:30 Coffee Break and Explore Marketplace
10:30 – 11:30 2nd Speaker
LESLEY ANDERSON: ANCESTRY DNA
11:30 – 11:45 Comfort Break
11:45 – 12:30 3rd Speaker 
GLORIA TUBMAN: SCOTTISH HOME CHILDREN
Noon Break 12:30 – 1:45 Lunch Break and Explore Marketplace - Raffle Draws at 1 pm
Afternoon 1:45 – 2:45 4th Speaker 
NOREEN KRUZICH: FIRST NATION AND METIS ROOTS
2:45 Closing Remarks
Till 3:00 Explore Marketplace
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Further information at adarchives@hotmail.com

Hazards of Researching Family History: Skeletons in the Closet

Some people think it's only DNA testing that reveals genealogical surprises. Not so. In my own case it was digitized newspapers. If you're not prepared for surprises it's best not to look.

Lifespan and Causes of Death in Britain

In 100 years the average lifespan has increased by 30 years in Britain. An article from the (UK) Office of National Statistics at http://visual.ons.gov.uk/causes-of-death-over-100-years/ presents the trends and details the causes.